Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution (2020)

Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution Marilynne Robinson Mother Country Britain the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution At the time when Robinson wrote this book the largest known source of radioactive contamination of the world s environment was a government owned nuclear plant called Sellafield not far from Wordswo
  • Title: Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution
  • Author: Marilynne Robinson
  • ISBN: 9780374526597
  • Page: 296
  • Format: Paperback
Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution Marilynne Robinson At the time when Robinson wrote this book, the largest known source of radioactive contamination of the world s environment was a government owned nuclear plant called Sellafield, not far from Wordsworth s cottage in the Lakes District one child in sixty was dying from leukemia in the village closest to the plant The central question of this eloquently impassioned book iAt the time when Robinson wrote this book, the largest known source of radioactive contamination of the world s environment was a government owned nuclear plant called Sellafield, not far from Wordsworth s cottage in the Lakes District one child in sixty was dying from leukemia in the village closest to the plant The central question of this eloquently impassioned book is How can a country that we persist in calling a welfare state consciously risk the lives of its people for profit.Mother Country is a 1989 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.
Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution Marilynne Robinson

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    296 Marilynne Robinson
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    Posted by:Marilynne Robinson
    Published :2020-04-05T10:50:00+00:00

One thought on “Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution

  1. Mike

    Mother Country would most definitely not survive in the Internet age, or rather, the Golden Age of Unreasonableness Slate recently posted an article about the unsubstantiated dismissal of any study reporting correlation between two events with the adage correlation does not mean causation as pedestrian hogwash I am inclined to agree with this statement because it s best to err on the side of information whether or not it entirely illuminates cause Further to say correlation does not mean causat [...]

  2. Roman Skaskiw

    Changed my understanding of the world It s half expose on British History, half discussion of Britain s Sellafield nuclear reactor the country s nuclear waste industry.The first part reminded me why we had a revolution The second made me rethink the focus of Green Peace and their ilk.At times, I would have preferred exacting evidence and arguments in lieu of the verbose style.

  3. Angela

    I feel like this should be a must read for everyone because it challenges the normal and romanticized perceptions of Britain s history and culture, but because it it brings to light the awful reality of nuclear waste processing in our world.

  4. Andrew

    Deeply unnerving and essential.I just finished this, and I m very nearly speechless Writing during the 1980s the years of Thatcher and Reagan Robinson is livid, and the writing does her anger justice Why is she livid On account of the apparently utter carelessness and connivance of the British government and numerous allies in the reprocessing of nuclear waste to create plutonium the world s deadliest poison while dumping the radioactive byproducts into the Irish Sea, where they spread by tide a [...]

  5. R.

    I had mixed opinions on this book As always, I enjoyed Robinson s eloquent writing and deep thinking However, from a scientific perspective, she had a couple of places where she went a bit wrong In general, it was well argued and interesting, but not my favorite of her essays.

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