The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles from 350 to 650 (2020)

The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles from 350 to 650 John Robert Morris The Age of Arthur A History of the British Isles from to A lifetime s scholarship enabled John Morris to recreate a past hitherto hidden in myth and mystery He describes the Arthurian Age as the starting point of future British history for it saw the tran
  • Title: The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles from 350 to 650
  • Author: John Robert Morris
  • ISBN: 9780684133133
  • Page: 161
  • Format: Hardcover
The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles from 350 to 650 John Robert Morris A lifetime s scholarship enabled John Morris to recreate a past hitherto hidden in myth and mystery He describes the Arthurian Age as the starting point of future British history , for it saw the transition from Roman Britain to Great Britain, the establishment of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales from the collapse of the Pax Romana In exploring political, social, ecA lifetime s scholarship enabled John Morris to recreate a past hitherto hidden in myth and mystery He describes the Arthurian Age as the starting point of future British history , for it saw the transition from Roman Britain to Great Britain, the establishment of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales from the collapse of the Pax Romana In exploring political, social, economic, religious and cultural history from the fourth to the seventh century, his theme is one of continuity That continuity is embodied in Arthur himself in name he was the last Roman Emperor, but he ruled as the first medieval king.
The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles from 350 to 650 John Robert Morris

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    Published :2019-06-13T09:02:26+00:00

One thought on “The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles from 350 to 650

  1. Erik Graff

    I ve long been interested in the history of Roman Britain as well as in the Matter of Britain , Arthurian literature and Grail legends, but I ve done little previous study of the history of the islands between the years of change covered in this lengthy tome Although mentioning Arthur in the title, very little is actually detailed about this legendary king Although author Morris believes his existence incontrovertible, his treatment of the man is as a symbol of the end of the old British Roman c [...]

  2. Chris

    The sixties and early seventies were an exciting time for those interested in that transitional period between the removal of Roman troops from Britain and the lowland s transformation into England, the land of the Angles and Saxons, of course Long disparaged as the Dark Ages or the lost centuries , this Cinderella period was then becoming acceptable to scholars to study under alternative, less romantic labels post Roman, Early Medieval, Late Celtic, Early Christian, Late Antiquity or Anglo Sax [...]

  3. Flint Johnson

    There are thousands of sources for the British period 400 through 650, mostly saints lives The unfortunate thing is that these biographies are full of fancy, both in the miracles attributed to their subjects and in the persons they are connected to On the surface, it makes for a stable chronology The reality is that most of them are entirely erroneous John Morris pooled together a remarkable amount of information from a barrage of legal, historical, and literary sources in presenting his view of [...]

  4. Terence Gallagher

    The virtues of this book far outweigh its defects Those defects include a readiness to jump to keenly desired conclusions e.g the existence of an Empire of Arthur , a propensity to ground much later historical developments in much earlier situations without considering the intervening history, and the common British historian s trick of substituting a dismissive remark for an argument The virtues include the clearest exposition of the history of the period that I have ever read, an unusually dee [...]

  5. Simon

    I well remember the excitement with which I ordered my copy of John Morris The Age of Arthur as soon as it was published in 1973 But it has taken me over 40 years finally to read this tome from cover to cover and I now realise why John Morris heroic attempt to reconstruct in detail the history of the British Isles and Brittany in the centuries following the collapse of Roman rule was based on his analysis of all the extant evidence But his arcane and complicated reference system relied on his Ar [...]

  6. Pete daPixie

    Men went to Catraeth, shouting for battle, a squadron of horse.Blue their armour and their shields, lances uplifted and sharp, mail and sword glintingough they were slain, they slew None to his home returnedort their lives, long the grief among their kin.Seven times their number, the English they slew Many the women they widowed and many the mothers who weptter the wine and after the mead they left us, armoured in mail I know the sorrow of their death.Thet were slain, they never grew grey the ar [...]

  7. Jenopcer

    Very interesting but he seemed to have trouble with the actual composition of the book For instance, he d say something like, The British and the Irish differed in three ways and then the paragraph would end and he d start something new, leaving us to wonder what the three ways were I found myself often thinking things like, Martin Who s Martin He never mentioned him before I m an American so I wouldn t automatically know who Martin is, as he seemed to assume the reader would Not particularly we [...]

  8. Ian Chapman

    An interesting marshalling of information from the era For me, the author s linking of the Old Welsh Lament for Geraint with the mention in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle of killing a very noble Briton in a beach skirmish, was masterly I think it quite possible that the Welsh and Saxon were describing the same happening.

  9. Pete

    Reading the Age of Arthur is only for the serious student of early British history One can expect to wade through quite a few details In doing so, you ll find evidence, though much criticized, for a real Arthur.

  10. Steve Bivans

    In depth look at the history behind the myth of Arthur, though mostly focusing on the age of the mythical king, and not the origins of the myth itself The book is dry in parts, but well worth reading if you re interested in penetrating the mists of Britain s history.

  11. Robin

    I m not sure what to make of this book Some great historical sketches of Ancient Britton laced with nutcase theories A historian locked away in his office too long perhaps.

  12. Jon Laiche

    This book helped to begin and define my career as scholar, historian, teacher, techie, and modern pagan.

  13. Sean Keefe

    A slog, but a worthy one Excellent source for those wishing to expand their knowledge of British History.

  14. Richard Wyndbourne

    An unmatched historical survey to the time of its publication of the known events of Dark Ages Britain by region and ethnic community.

  15. Dfordoom

    While his theories on the historicity of King Arthur are not widely accepted these days, this is still a fascinating read.

  16. Richard Thomas

    A good history of an age where sources are scant and what does exist is often ambiguous and misleading.

  17. Bruce Macfarlane

    This book set me off on a trail to identify the origins of King Arthur Although a little dated now it is packed with information on Dark Age Britain

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