Getting Used to Dying (2020)

Getting Used to Dying Zhang Xianliang Getting Used to Dying For years Zhang Xianliang has been in and out of prison and labor camps while achieving recognition as one of China s foremost writers and this powerful autobiographical novel and insider s portrait
  • Title: Getting Used to Dying
  • Author: Zhang Xianliang
  • ISBN: 9780060165215
  • Page: 292
  • Format: None
Getting Used to Dying Zhang Xianliang For years, Zhang Xianliang has been in and out of prison and labor camps while achieving recognition as one of China s foremost writers, and this powerful autobiographical novel and insider s portrait brilliantly chronicles what it means to be Chinese in China today.
Getting Used to Dying Zhang Xianliang

  • [PDF] ✓ Getting Used to Dying | BY Ø Zhang Xianliang
    292 Zhang Xianliang
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Getting Used to Dying | BY Ø Zhang Xianliang
    Posted by:Zhang Xianliang
    Published :2020-01-16T11:20:42+00:00

One thought on “Getting Used to Dying

  1. Kirstie

    An intriguing and intimate story of a Chinese poet intellectual who spent extended periods of time in and out of labour reform camps in the years leading up to the Cultural Revolution It s all getting into bed here, getting out of a grave there is how the writer in the final pages humorously refers to the book he is writing, which is clearly semi autobiographical, and yes, sex and death are the persistent obsessions and entwined dominant themes but by no means the most interesting aspect of this [...]

  2. Alana

    I enjoyed this book, although I m sure that it is not for everyone Its written somewhat in the same style as Haruki Mirakami There is a lot of imagery and metaphysical concepts About half way through the book, I realized that the author protagonist was mentally ill This is acknowledged and stated in the latter half of the book several times The protagonist is struggling to feel life outside, when he is dead inside The only way he thinks he can feel life is with women, although the sex act makes [...]

  3. Katie Lynn

    I m having a difficult time rating this book.Did I like the man No.Is that due to his environment and hence who he s become Possibly.Did I understand everything he was trying to convey No.Is that due to his environment and hence who he s become Possibly.Did I get a glimpse into what he was trying to say Yes.Did I like what I saw No.Isn t that kind of the point Possibly.Is some of that connection I was lacking due to translation Possibly Probably.I didn t like the book, but the I reflect on it, [...]

  4. Kelly (TheWellReadRedhead)

    I picked this book at random, because I m trying to read 1 author from every letter of the alphabet this year, and X is hard to find I found the book difficult to get into at first, mostly because it is written in a very confusing, haphazard way both the timeline and the narrator changes frequently However, the translator s note helped quite a bit, and by a few chapters in I had a good sense of the novel.In the end, I thought this book conveyed a lot of interesting messages about the effects of [...]

  5. Chas Bayfield

    No where near as depressing as the title suggests, despite being set in China under the oppressive Maoist regime The language and descriptions are beautiful and death is treated as a fact of life.

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