The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008 (2020)

The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008 Lucas A. Powe Jr. The Supreme Court and the American Elite The Supreme Court follows the election returns the fictional Mr Dooley observed a hundred years ago And for all our ideals and dreams of a disinterested judiciary above the political fray it seems
  • Title: The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008
  • Author: Lucas A. Powe Jr.
  • ISBN: 9780674032675
  • Page: 188
  • Format: Hardcover
The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008 Lucas A. Powe Jr. The Supreme Court follows the election returns, the fictional Mr Dooley observed a hundred years ago And for all our ideals and dreams of a disinterested judiciary, above the political fray, it seems Mr Dooley was right In this engaging and disturbing book, a leading historian of the Court reveals the close fit between its decisions and the nation s politics.The st The Supreme Court follows the election returns, the fictional Mr Dooley observed a hundred years ago And for all our ideals and dreams of a disinterested judiciary, above the political fray, it seems Mr Dooley was right In this engaging and disturbing book, a leading historian of the Court reveals the close fit between its decisions and the nation s politics.The story begins with the creation of the Constitution and ends with the June 2008 decisions on the rights of detainees at Guantanamo Bay Rendering crisp and often controversial judgments on key decisions from Marbury v Madison to the War on Terror, Lucas Powe shows how virtually every major Supreme Court ruling, however deftly framed in constitutional terms, suited the wishes of the most powerful politicians of the time This history reflects a changing Court, from the country s early struggles over commerce and transportation to the torturous justifications of slavery before the Civil War, to a post New Deal interest in ending segregation, controlling criminal procedure, and addressing knotty questions arising from the Cold War Through all of this the Court emerges as part of a ruling regime, doing its best to implement the regime s policies.Drawing on than four decades of thinking about the Supreme Court and its role in the American political system, this book offers a new, clear, and troubling perspective on American jurisprudence, politics, and history.
The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008 Lucas A. Powe Jr.

  • [KINDLE] Á The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008 | By ↠ Lucas A. Powe Jr.
    188 Lucas A. Powe Jr.
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    Posted by:Lucas A. Powe Jr.
    Published :2019-06-21T08:25:37+00:00

One thought on “The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008

  1. Michael

    This book serves as a forum for the author to give his two cents about the Supreme Court s major opinions over the years The conclusion he comes to is that the Court is a majoritarian institution that usually holds that the Constitution says and does what the majority of Americans want the Constitution to say and do, which, given the schizoid nature of some of the Court s jurisprudence, is as good an explanation as any for why the Court does what it does The reader should be warned, however, tha [...]

  2. B

    Contrary to the flashy title and an assertion in the acknowledgements, this book lacks a thesis.It just mentions a lot of important cases by era and then by theme Instead of a thesis, the author starts adding some snark as the cases get closer to the date of publication It seems like ultimately the author means to challenge judicial supremacy well, no, that s not right.It seems that he thinks he s smarter than all the judges and so the judges should not be in charge of interpreting the law But i [...]

  3. Adam Omelianchuk

    The SCOTUS is a majoritarian institution that serves to justify the popular sentiments of the day Or so argues Powe, persuasively I might add No one should will be under the false and naive illusion that the Court exists to interpret and apply the Constitution like an umpire who interprets and applies the rules of baseball.

  4. Oliver Bateman

    A breezy, opinionated version of the same history that every late career legal scholar writes Hey Mr Powe, have you ever heard of archival research No But you had assistants, for cryin out loud

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