Children of Dust: A Portrait of a Muslim as a Young Man (2020)

Children of Dust: A Portrait of a Muslim as a Young Man Ali Eteraz Children of Dust A Portrait of a Muslim as a Young Man An extraordinary personal journey from Islamic fundamentalism to a new life in the westIn this spellbinding portrayal of a life that few Americans can imagine Ali Eteraz tells the story of his school
  • Title: Children of Dust: A Portrait of a Muslim as a Young Man
  • Author: Ali Eteraz
  • ISBN: 9780061626852
  • Page: 114
  • Format: Paperback
Children of Dust: A Portrait of a Muslim as a Young Man Ali Eteraz An extraordinary personal journey from Islamic fundamentalism to a new life in the westIn this spellbinding portrayal of a life that few Americans can imagine, Ali Eteraz tells the story of his schooling in a madrassa in Pakistan, his teenage years as a Muslim American in the Bible Belt, and his voyage back to Pakistan to find a pious Muslim wife This lyrical, penetratingAn extraordinary personal journey from Islamic fundamentalism to a new life in the westIn this spellbinding portrayal of a life that few Americans can imagine, Ali Eteraz tells the story of his schooling in a madrassa in Pakistan, his teenage years as a Muslim American in the Bible Belt, and his voyage back to Pakistan to find a pious Muslim wife This lyrical, penetrating saga from a brilliant new literary voice captures the heart of our universal quest for identity and the temptations of religious extremism.
Children of Dust: A Portrait of a Muslim as a Young Man Ali Eteraz

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    Published :2019-04-07T19:27:58+00:00

One thought on “Children of Dust: A Portrait of a Muslim as a Young Man

  1. Jennifer

    This was another disappointing read in my quest for a sensitive book which informs and entertains me about Islam An OK read, I persisted through the low level of entertainment and information that was on offer through the time of Abir Amir Ali through his good boy years in Pakistan, and into his fine young muslim years in America through high school and uni, in the hope that when his disillusionment grew, some feelings would be explained or intellectualised But when I got to his anti islamic ph [...]

  2. Nathan

    This isn t a memoir of Pakistan it s the journey of a boy from religious orthodoxy to unbelief to zealotry to moderate universalism With the cluttered, clunky prose made ubiquitous by The Kite Runner , Eteraz relates his life as he receives his childhood education in the madrassas, grows rooted in the Islamic traditions, and quickly loses his faith upon moving to the West Nothing in particular seems to account for that loss I m left with the distinct impression that he left the faith out of pure [...]

  3. Mikey B.

    I have to confess that I found this a little confusing for a memoir because so much is written in dialogue form, even when the author is a young child It reads like a novel than an autobiography, but the reading is very understandable and fluid.The first part is the most engaging as it discusses his upbringing in Pakistan which is most Dickensian with the poverty, the teachers who force memorization of religious texts the Koran and beat their students at a whim I suppose the passages on sodomy [...]

  4. else fine

    Normally, I m opposed to young people writing memoirs, just on principle Children of Dust shamed me I was wrong to judge It is so, so good a remarkable story told with skill and charm, and uplifting in the best possible way.

  5. Irving Karchmar

    Ali Eteraz is a thoughtful, intelligent, and at times, bitingly funny writer His very popular, now defunct blog, in which he wrote both comic and serious essays about Pakistani politics, Islamic sexuality, and extremist militancy, led to his eventually becoming a contributor to The Guardian UK and writing articles for such mainstream venues as Dissent, Foreign Policy, and The Huffington Post.In Children of Dust A Memoir of Pakistan, Eteraz reveals his true gifts as a storyteller It is a delight [...]

  6. Trupti Dorge

    I almost feel inadequate reviewing this book because I m sure I haven t understood everything the author wanted to convey But I loved what I grasped from it That s not to say the book is a difficult read, far from it.Children of Dust is not merely a memoir of Pakistan , although the time the author spent in Pakistan, up to the age of 10, was a large part of what constituted his religious outlook.The book is divided into parts The first part, when the author is a child, takes place in Pakistan He [...]

  7. Barbara

    I am not really sure what I feel about this book First, I may know a bit about Pakistan, its people and religion than the average American I have been married to a Pakistani for almost 26 years I have been to the country many times and so I am looking at this from a different angle than most Americans Certainly the part about living in Pakistan as a young boy rang true We don t know where he lived, but we know it s not a large town and I know that there are people like he describes It may be ha [...]

  8. Kimm

    Typically, I enjoy books set in countries such as Afghanistan and Pakistan I find the contrast between their cultures and American culture to be interesting and informative The predominance of religion weighs heavily in the mix of course, and that will always distinguish a multitude of differences Children of Dust by Ali Eteraz is a book that illustrates just how different our worlds truly are Eteraz grows up stuck between these worlds, trying to understand his place and purpose He s the product [...]

  9. Yaqeen Sikander

    A very beautifully and well written memoir I loved the way Author writes and narrates various accounts But for a common reader this book might create anti Islamic sentiments The book portrays the thought of Islam being so backward which is actually the problem with rural Pakistani culture where the Author grew up He seems to be frustrated sexually balancing between Islam and girls By the end it becomes better.

  10. Saeed

    I found the entire account fascinating The author s experience growing up in Pakistan is almost frightening and the drastic contrast from his later years makes it all the haunting He s not the best writer and the prose isn t too polished but the substance of his transformations make up for it Well worth reading for those who want a perspective on how religious people can vacillate from one extreme to te other at times.

  11. Pritika

    beautiful Loved the seemingly effortless beautiful writing Can t wait to read works of this author Such deep insight into Islam Thank you.

  12. Sara

    Amazing book This is how it is and the author is very honest Sad in some parts but I couldn t put it down

  13. Abbe

    Ali Eteraz s Children of Dust is a spellbinding portrayal of a life that few Americans can imagine From his schooling in a madrassa in Pakistan to his teenage years as a Muslim American in the Bible Belt, and back to Pakistan to find a pious Muslim wife, this lyrical, penetrating saga from a brilliant new literary voice captures the heart of our universal quest for identity Children of Dust begins in rural Islam at the lowest levels of Pakistani society in the turbulent eighties This intimate po [...]

  14. Tina

    This was an interesting read and what I loved about it was that I had no idea where it was going What I didn t love so much was where it went.The author grew up in Pakistan and tells a very amusing and interesting tale of growing up Muslim and the various phases he went through as he came to the US in his teen years and tried to fit in.Eventually he becomes an activist for the Palestinian cause, but then retreats when he sees how politics detract from his beliefs After 9 11 he commits himself to [...]

  15. Aneesah

    I would definitely get another book of Ali Eteraz if and only if he decides to write a book on non religion subject Story begins with Ali s childhood in Pakistan with a lot of ingenious humor which I extensively connected with and recalled many similar occasions as a child who grew up in a Muslim country The subject becomes heavy when Ali grew up and moved to US with his family His opinion and views about Islam at his teenage years, is something most Muslim teenagers would comprehend I am afraid [...]

  16. Diane

    This was kind of a sleeper I saw the author s name on Facebook, commenting on a friend s post, got his book and began reading it as a way of learning about Pakistan in keeping with a thread in my reading life to do with learning about other places and times through fiction I had it in mind I was reading a work of fiction and it took awhile for it to dawn on me that the subtitle A Memoir of Pakistan was meant to be taken literally That s not just because I m that obtuse, but because the book is s [...]

  17. Tuscany Bernier

    This novel was extremely captivating You follow the author through his life in four sections One sees the protagonist change his mind over and over again about his relationship with Islam and his heritage as a Punjabi American How he travels from the extremes of super conservative to staunch reformerAs a post 9 11 convert, some of what talks about drives me crazy, like his insistance that having converts in his family tree as a let down and how he thinks the way to piety is through arabizing him [...]

  18. Zineb

    I could never put into words the process I had undergone myself, vis vis my relationship with Islam, my zealous religiosity to the gradual lack thereof, to the consequent attempt to detach Islam from my life, from my various cultural expressions As a writer, I had tried to convey how I felt in an attempt to justify my state, to build a case My father, an avid reader would read my account and understand me, empathize and perhaps forgive To no avail, my frustration grew as the ideas couldn t be wr [...]

  19. Susan

    Why is this called Children of Dust The book is interesting, but it seems inauthentic, Ali is writing for a western audience, and their appears to be no real soul searching here There is nothing to offend the mullahs here, but neither is there any feeling of compassion for the victims of Islamist violence Is that the author or the Islam There are a couple of insights, but this is definitely a book by an alienated outsider Some events and things don t ring true, his father is a doctor and cant fi [...]

  20. Mona Bomgaars

    Easily read book about a Pakistani boy and his focus on living a righteous Islamic life Not easy This book was chosen as the book and author for the 2012 Chautauqua week on Pakistan.The in person presentation by the author went well, his introductory comments include conversations between humankind and God with many quotes from Pakistani poets Personally a very charming young man.

  21. Molly Bosscher

    I read books because otherwise I wouldn t know the experiences of others This book is no exception Growing up in Pakistan, Ali Eteraz life is and was so different from my own, and reading this I had a glimpse of what it was like to be him There were many parts that were hard to read, being both quite dramatic and distressing, and I wish I had a reading group to discuss the themes and stories in this book.

  22. Marie

    I found this book so interesting I ended up emailing the author looking for other books on Muslim Desert life I asked if there are any happy family stories out there I m not sure that there is This book shows the human strength and fragility associated with strong religious beliefs, it can be observed in any major religion not just this one The book is witty and easy to read.

  23. Monica Riva

    La trama scorre bene ed interessante vedere tante sfaccettature della religione islamica, che noi cristiani, bench in questi anni se ne parli molto, conosciamo poco.La fine per mi ha lasciata un po perplessa nel senso che non l ho proprio capita.Peccato perch mancandomi la chiave di lettura finale non ho potuto dar un giudizio molto positivo, che magari avrebbe anche meritato.Magari qualcuno che l ha letto, mi pu spiegare il finale

  24. Katie

    Fascinating, intimate and highly detailed portrait of how Eteraz s life has been highly shaped by Islam Includes his upbringing in Pakistan life in the U.S including college years , and eventual return to the Middle East.

  25. Kim Foulds

    The writing is wonderful but I struggled with the author consistently seeing himself as the sun rather than the movement he was part of In each phase of life he was looking for major public acknowledgment rather than hope that the movement he was part of was a success.

  26. Don

    The book is truly written in memoir fashion, taking the reader from the author s young years in Pakistan to his teenage years in America primarily Alabama and some of his young adult travels involving college and work, including a trip back to Pakistan Initially, it was difficult for me to get into the book as each chapter was somewhat of a short disjointed snippet, each relaying a seemingly random experience It tends to come together as it approaches the middle and end, where those quick snippe [...]

  27. Jeremy

    While it s difficult for my atheist mind to comprehend how anyone could believe in deities, I am nevertheless curious about those who do there are so many, after all, of so many varieties Hoping this book would lend me some insight into the Muslim mind, I found the book unsurprising and disheartening Yes, I learned some Arabic words yes, I learned some things about the Quran I never knew and yes, I was drawn in by the author s seeming sincerity But and it s a gigantic but how sad to learn that t [...]

  28. Dixie Theriault

    I was interested in reading this book because since Nine Eleven, I have attempted to gain some understanding into the Muslim beliefs and culture.This book is a memoir of one man s reflection of his life growing up in the Islam faith It begins with his humble childhood in Pakistan, and extends through his immigration to the US, ending up as a teenager in Alabama, then back to Pakistan.The religious zeal with which he was brought up was actually not unlike a couple of people that I knew back in gr [...]

  29. Lauren

    In the introduction, the author assures us that it is alright to find humor even in the face of extreme religious fundamentalism, but the only passage which appeared to be presented as a joke is when a young man is found raping a baby goat, to which the punchline appears to be we d better find him a wife Misdirected or absent Perhaps the author forgot about the forewarning humor aside, as a memoir it s self defeating to expect a conclusion or sense of completeness by the time one reaches the end [...]

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